Texturizer User's Guide

For Texturizer 1.8
Updated June 23rd

This is the User's Guide to Texturizer, the powerful text editor from Boingos. This document is written solely in Texturizer and answers the most common questions about the program. The latest version of Texturizer can be downloaded from www.texturizer.net.


Contents


Features In Texturizer


What's Better Than Notepad?

    When looking at the list of features above, it's quite obvious that there are many things that are better in Texturizer, compared to Notepad. But there are some features that are more important than others. The three most outstanding features in Texturizer are the Macro support, the multiple Undo/Redo and the Find/Replace. These features, I believe, are the best reasons for using Texturizer instead of Notepad. In fact, the macro capabilities only, are enough to beat most text editors out there. Other interesting features include fully configurable syntax highlighting, a programmable toolbar, Cliptext lists and customizable keyboard shortcuts. The ability to open large files and to open several files in the same window are also good features that Notepad doesn't have.

    The Macro feature is an ability to record a set of keystrokes and replay them at a later time. This is a very powerful feature, which can be used for many different purposes. With macros, you can create your own functions and store them as files that you can load and use at a later time. Texturizer can even load macro files automatically on startup. There are many "hidden" features in Texturizer that can be accessed only by creating macros. The Texturizer User's Guide includes comprehensive information about macros, and how to create and edit them.

    Multiple Undo/Redo means that you can undo and/or redo several actions. Notepad can only undo one single action, so if you delete two blocks of text, you will only be able to undo the last deletion. In Texturizer, you can undo over 30,000 steps, which virtually saves all your actions when editing a file.

    Cliptext lists are configurable lists of text that can be inserted into your documents with a single click. Texturizer brings these lists a bit further, by letting you store macros in them too! You should read the Texturizer User's Guide to learn how to create your own Cliptext lists and macros.

    Texturizer includes a lot of built-in conversions, such as case conversions, tabs to spaces conversions, etc. Additionally, you can create your own conversions and store them as macros. Texturizer is shipped with some examples of macros, including a Text To Morse converter!

    Some texts are used often in documents, such as your e-mail or a web address (URL). In Texturizer, you can store up to 10 user defined text strings, which can easily be inserted to any document by pressing Ctrl+0 to Ctrl+9 or by choosing it from the menu. Of course, you can change the keyboard shortcuts for these text strings if you want, as well as all other menu and macro commands in Texturizer. If you need more text strings, simply create a Cliptext list with keyboard shortcuts assigned to them! The possibilities are almost unlimited...

    Despite the powerful features mentioned above, it's the details that make Texturizer so useful, such as the file tabs and the little "File Changed" indicator next to the filename. Many programs use Ctrl+A to Select All and Ctrl+S to Save, but Notepad don't. Guess what? Texturizer does!


Macros

    What Is A Macro?

      A macro is a set of keystrokes and/or menu selections that can be replayed. For instance, you can make a macro that replaces all occurrences of the word "adn" with "and", and then adds a signature at the end of the document. With a macro, you can automate tasks that you perform often in text files. You can virtually create your own functions and they can be loaded on start up if you like. In addition, you can bind keyboard shortcuts to macros. For example, you can make Shift+Ctrl+N create a new document with a HTML template inserted.

      Macros are probably most useful when it comes to small and repetitive keystrokes. Just press F8 and start pressing the keys you want to record and then press F8 again. Now, just replay the keystrokes by pressing (and holding down if you like) F6!

    Recording A Macro

      To create a new macro, select Record New Macro in the Macro menu. Texturizer will now start recording your keystrokes and menu selections. The word "[Recording]" will be displayed in the title bar of Texturizer. Note that mouse movements will not be recorded, so if you want to select text, use the keyboard. When you are finished with the macro, select Stop Recording in the Macro menu. The macro is now recorded and can be played back anytime.

      Note that not all menu commands and keystrokes will be recorded. For instance, switching between document tabs or selecting 'Help|About Texturizer' in the menu will be completely ignored.

    Playing A Macro

      Playing (or executing) a macro is simple. Just select the macro you want to play in the Macro menu and then select Play Macro (or press the F6 key). The macro will now execute. Additionally, you can open the Cliptext Window, accessible from the Insert menu, and then select the Loaded Macros list.

    Saving And Loading Macros

      If you have recorded a macro that you will want to use later on, you can save the macro as a file on your hard disk. Simply select Save Macro As... in the Macro menu and select the file name. The default file extension for macro files is *.mac, but you may use any file name you want. If you have created a group of macros that are related to each other, you can save all the loaded macros in one macro file using Save All Macros As... in the Macro menu.

      Loading a macro file is as simple as saving one. Select Load Macro File... in the Macro menu and pick the file you want to load. In addition to loading macro files manually, you can specify one or more macro files to be loaded automatically on start up.

    Editing Macros

      Currently, there are no built-in editing capabilities for macros in Texturizer. However, you can open a macro file in Texturizer and edit the source. In fact, you can do more by editing a macro file than you can do by just recording a macro! There are lots of macro codes that perform actions that are not recorded, such as the Scroll command. This section will explain all available macro codes in Texturizer.

      Example Of Macro Source

        Let's start with a simple example of a macro:

           -1 Macro Example
           -2 0
           -2 3+65
           -4 Shift+Ctrl+A
          001 Hello world
          026
          026
          026
          026
          000 +{LEFT}
          011
          027
          027
          027
          027
          027

          <-- The name of the macro
          <-- The macro properties
          <-- The keyboard shortcut
          <-- The shortcut caption (which will be displayed next to the name)
          <-- Start of the actual macro

        The first line, starting with -1, is the name of the macro. The second line, -2, is the properties for the macro (select Macro Properties in the Macro menu to change the properties for a macro). -3 is the current shortcut key used for that macro. If no shortcut is assigned, this line can be omitted. Finally, -4 represents the menu caption for the shortcut. For instance, if you have assigned the Escape key for a macro, you may want to add "Esc" in the menu, to indicate that this macro can be run by pressing that key. After these four lines, the actual macro starts.

        Each line in a macro represents a command in Texturizer. Some commands require two lines in the macro source. The first three digits is the actual command to be executed. This is known as the code section of the line. The following text on the line is the data for the current command. This is known as the data section of the line. Most commands don't need any data (parameters), as you can see in the example above.

        First, I will explain what the macro example actually does, and then I will explain how it does this.

        The macro example starts by printing the text Hello world at the current insertion point. After that, the Left arrow key is pressed four times, so the insertion point will be after the w in world. Then, the w is selected and converted to an upper case W. Finally, the Right Arrow key is pressed five times, to move the cursor to the end of the text.

        Now that you know what the macro does, let's explain each code in the example. The first command, 001, means Input Text. The data following the code (Hello world) is the text to input. After this, the command 027 is executed four times. This is the Left Arrow code, which will move the insertion point (the cursor) four characters backwards. Then the 000 command is executed. This was the first code implemented in Texturizer, and uses the SendKeys statement in VB. The data following the code (+{LEFT}) means that the key combination Shift+Left Arrow Key is pressed. This will select the character on the left side of the cursor (the w). After this, the Upper Case conversion is used (the 011 code), which will convert the w to a W. Finally the code 027 is executed five times. This is the Right Arrow key, which will move the cursor five characters forward.

      Syntax Rules

        Each line in the macro source starts with the macro code, followed by a space character, and finally any required data. The space separating the code from the data is only required if there is any data for the macro code.

        When the macro support in Texturizer was first implemented, it was not important how the actual macro source code looked like on disk. The aim was only to be able to save and load macros, in addition to just record and play them. That's why they don't look structured and readable. I am fully aware of the fact that editing macro files is not a very easy task. Nevertheless, it is possible.

        The macro support in Texturizer, along with the macro source code, may change completely in the future. It may look more like a simple script language, like JavaScript, but less complex. However, that is a project with low priority right now.

    Complete List Of Macro Codes

      This is a complete list of all available Macro codes in Texturizer. Some of them are described in detail below.

      Description Code Data
      Macro Name  -1 Name Of Macro
      Macro Properties  -2 1 * (Stop Macro if a Find/Replace string not found) + 2 * (Search through the whole document...)
      Shortcut Key  -3 (Shift)+(KeyCode) - Example: 2+65
      Shortcut Caption  -4 Any text - Example: Ctrl+A
      Special Key 000 Special keys like Home, End, Page Up, Page Down, Shift/Ctrl/Alt Key Combinations, etc.
      Plain Text 001 Any text to input
      Find/Find Next 002 Search String
      Replace/Replace Next 003 Search String
      Replace All 004 Search String
      Cut 005  
      Copy 006 Optional: Any text to copy to Clipboard
      Paste 007  
      Select All 008  
      Delete Key 009  
      To Lower Case 010  
      To Upper Case 011  
      Reverse Direction 012  
      Backspace Key 013  
      User Defined String 014 String Number (0-9)
      Insert Date/Time 015 Optional: Date/Time Code (0-11)
      Enter Key 016  
      Tab Key 017 Key Combination (1 * Shift + 2 * Ctrl + 4 * Alt)
      Undo 018  
      Redo 019  
      Invert Case 020  
      CR/LF's To Wrap 021  
      Wrap To CR/LF's 022 Column Number (0 for Window Wrap)
      Invert ANSI 023  
      Insert Key 024  
      Capitalize 025  
      Left Key 026  
      Right Key 027  
      Rotate Alphabet 028 Optional: Rotate Number
      Extend Selection 029 Search String
      Go To Line 030 Line Number (0 for Last Line, END for End Of Document)
      Special Cut, Append After Clipboard 031  
      Special Cut, Append Before Clipboard 032  
      Special Copy, Append After Clipboard 033 Optional: Any text to append to Clipboard
      Special Copy, Append Before Clipboard   034 Optional: Any text to append to Clipboard
      Extend Selection To End Of Word 035  
      Run 036 Optional: Command-Line/URL
      Insert Cliptext 037 Cliptext Data
      Rotate ANSI 038 Rotation Number
      Tabs To Spaces 039  
      Select Line 040  
      Spaces To Tabs 041  
      Copy Cliptext To Windows Clipboard 042 Cliptext Data
      Expand Selection To The Left 043 Number of characters (use negative values to reduce selection)
      Expand Selection To The Right 044 Number of characters (use negative values to reduce selection)
      Open Files 045 Filenames or wildcards
      Minimize 046  
      Scroll 047 Number of lines (use negative values to scroll upwards)
      OEM To ANSI 048  
      ANSI To OEM 049  
      Close, without confirmation 050  
      Close All, without confirmation 051  
      Revert, without confirmation 052  
      Revert All, without confirmation 053  
      Sentence Case 054  
      Select Line Block 055  
      Remove Characters 056 Characters to remove
      DOS Command 057 Command line
      Select Last Input 058
      Trim/Omit Preceding Character(s) 059 Character(s) to remove (default is spaces and tabs)
      Trim/Omit Trailing Character(s) 060 Character(s) to remove (default is spaces and tabs)
      Change File Format 061 1 = DOS, 2 = UNIX, 3 = MAC
      Change File Encoding 062 0 = ANSI, 1 = Unicode
           

      Explanation Of Some Macro Codes

        000 - Special Key

          This macro code is used to send special keystrokes, such as the Home, End, Up and Down keys. The keys to be sent follow a specific syntax, as described below. Actually, any key can be sent using this macro code, but Texturizer will use the 001 code to send plain text, as this is both faster and more reliable.

          The keys that should use this macro code are:

          Key Key Code
          Home {HOME}
          End {END}
          Left Arrow Key {LEFT}
          Right Arrow Key {RIGHT}
          Up Arrow Key {UP}
          Down Arrow Key {DOWN}
          Page Up {PGUP}
          Page Down {PGDN}
          Shift +
          Ctrl ^
          Alt %
             

          The Shift, Ctrl and Alt codes should be used before other key codes. For instance, if you want to send the keystroke Shift+Left Arrow Key (which will select a character to the left of the insertion point), use +{LEFT} as the data.

          The {LEFT} and {RIGHT} codes should only be used with any of the Shift, Ctrl or Alt key combination. If you only want to press the Left or the Right arrow key without any other keys pressed, use the macro codes 026 and 027 instead.

        002, 003, 004 - Find/Replace

          All these codes have a second line in the macro file. The Code of the line represents the settings for the Find/Replace command, as explained below, and the Data contains the Replace String.

          The settings code uses this formula:

            64 * (Cliptext Variables) + 16 * (Scope) + 8 * (Direction > 1) + 4 * (Whole Word) + 2 * (Match Case) + 1 * (Direction < 2)

          Note that the Direction variable is represented twice in the formula. Texturizer versions prior to version 1.2 didn't have the All Direction, just Up and Down. Therefore, only one bit (0 or 1) was necessary for the Direction. Version 1.2 introduced the All Direction, which made two bits (0 to 3) necessary. The least significant bit in the formula represents the least significant bit in the Direction variable. If you don't understand the concept of bit significance, that's ok, you will probably not need to know it anyway!

        029 - Extend Selection

          This code also uses a second line to hold the settings for the Extend Selection function. The settings are stored in the Code section, using this formula:

            8 * (Move Cursor Only) + 4 * (Cliptext Variables) + 2 * (Search Upwards) + 1 * (Any character but the specified...)

        036 - Run

          This macro code uses a second line to hold the settings for the window state and the command-line parameters. The data for the first line represents the program or URL to run. If omitted, the selected text or word will be run, just as if you selected Run from the Edit menu. The data for the second line represents the command-line parameters for the program to run. The code for the second line represents the window state. The following values are accepted:

          Code Window State
          0 Hidden
          1 Normal, Focus
          2 Minimized, Focus
          3 Maximized, Focus
          4 Normal, No Focus
          6 Minimized, No Focus
          + 8 Cliptext Variables
             

          The Cliptext Variables code, which changes some characters in the program/URL and command-line parameters string, can be combined with any of the other codes. For instance, if you want to run a program maximized and with the Cliptext Variables option active, use 11 for the code (3 + 8).

        037 - Insert Cliptext

          This is the code for Cliptext insertions. All Cliptext codes are allowed, except for the #Macro code. This is because this code requires more than one line. However, by using the #MacroFile code, you can play several macros in the same macro.

        038 - Rotate ANSI

          This code uses a second line to specify the ANSI code boundaries, where the code section holds the lower boundary and the data section holds the upper boundary.

        057 - DOS Command

          This code uses a second line to specify the working path for the DOS Command. The code selection of the second line is not used.

        059 - Trim/Omit Preceding Character(s)

          This function uses a second line, where the code section specifies which option is to be used. The alternatives are as follows:

          000 - Trim All Preceding Characters
          001 - Trim Preceding Characters from first line only
          002 - Trim First Character Only
          003 - Omit Preceding Characters from selection
          004 - Omit First Character from selection

          If the data section of the second line is 1, the function will trim/omit any characters but the specified characters.

        060 - Trim/Omit Trailing Character(s)

          This function uses a second line, where the code section specifies which option is to be used. The alternatives are as follows:

          000 - Trim All Trailing Characters
          001 - Trim Trailing Characters from last line only
          002 - Trim Last Character Only
          003 - Omit Trailing Characters from selection
          004 - Omit Last Character from selection

          If the data section of the second line is 1, the function will trim/omit any characters but the specified characters.


Cliptext

    Cliptexts are lists of text that can easily be inserted into documents in Texturizer. These lists can contain just about anything and are fully configurable. For instance, you can have a list of URLs to all your directories in your home page.

      Creating A Cliptext List

        If you open one of the Cliptext files included in the installation file of Texturizer, you will get the idea how these list files works. The three important codes to remember are #T, \S and |#|. Let's look at an example:

          #Title=Cliptext Example
          # This is an example of a Cliptext file!
          #Sort=n

          #T=My e-mail
          djst@revolt.com
          #T=Hypertext link
          <a href="|#|URL Here|#|">\s</a>
          #T=Bold
          <b>\s|#|</b>

        #Title is the name of the whole list, which will be displayed in the drop down list of available Cliptext lists. A #, followed by a space, is a line comment code. Everything on that line will be ignored. #Sort is a Yes/No variable which determines if the list should be sorted or not. It only checks the first letter, which should be either y (yes) or n (no).

        As you might have guessed, the text after the #T is the text to display in the list. The row(s) below is the text to insert. Note that the text to be inserted is using the Cliptext Variables, which means that if you want to insert the "\" or the "#" character, you must type "\\" and "\#" in the Cliptext file, respectively.

        If you look at the last line in the example, you will see that the \S code is used. This is a Cliptext Variable, which represents the selected text. If text is selected when inserting a Cliptext with this code in it, the selection will be included in the Cliptext at the specific position, rather than being replaced completely by the Cliptext.

        Furthermore, the |#| code is used. This is the position of the cursor, which means that the cursor will be placed right before the "</b>" part of the Cliptext in the example above. If the |#| code is used twice in a Cliptext, the text between these two codes will be selected. For instance, the text "URL Here" will be selected in the "Hypertext link" example.

        Actually, you can use several lines for the text. For example, you can store your signature in a Cliptext list. However, if you want to insert large text blocks, there is a better way of doing it. Let's look at another example:

          #Title=Templates
          #Sort=yes

          #T=C++ Template
          #File=C:\MyDocs\Template.cpp
          # This line is just a comment and will be ignored!
          #T=HTML Template
          #File=C:\MyDocs\Template.html

        Here we use the #File code, which indicates that a specific file should be inserted in the text. If you double click on the list item "C++ Template" in the Cliptext Window, the C:\MyDocs\Template.cpp file will be inserted into the document, at the current position.

      Using Macros In Cliptext Lists

        Cliptext lists can do more than just inserting plain text into your documents. A Cliptext file can also contain macros, or point to saved macro files on your hard drive. When clicking on these list items, the macro will be played. Here follows an example which shows three ways of using macros in Cliptext lists:

          #Title=Some Macros
          #Sort=y

          # Method 1: Point to saved macro file with one or more macros in it
          #MacroFile=C:\MyDocs\Html.mac

          # Method 2: Point to saved macro file and specify which macro to use
          #MacroFile=C:\MyDocs\Other.mac|3

          # Method 3: Integraded Macro
          #T=The Name of the Macro
          #Macro
          001 Hello world
          026
          026
          026
          026
          000 +{LEFT}
          011
          027
          027
          027
          027
          027

        By using the #MacroFile code, you can specify existing macros (wildcards are allowed) to display in the list. Note that this Cliptext code does not require the #T code to specify the name; the name of the macro will be used instead.

        Since macro files in Texturizer can contain more than one macro, you can also specify which macro to display by adding "|n" right after the filename, where n is the number of the macro in the file. If |n is omitted, all available macros in the macro file will be displayed in the Cliptext list.

        Finally, macros can also be completely integrated with the Cliptext file by using the #Macro code, followed by the macro source. This method requires the #T code to specify the text in the list, as you can see in the example above. Any name specified in the macro itself will be ignored.

      Using Shortcuts In Cliptext Lists

        Cliptext lists can have keyboard shortcuts assigned to them. However, you will only be able to use the shortcuts while the list is loaded. If you change the active Cliptext list, the shortcuts will be removed.

          #Title=Cliptext with shortcuts
          #Sort=no

          #T=Some text
          #Shortcut=2+66
          This text will be inserted if you press Ctrl+B!

        As mentioned above, any shortcuts assigned in the Cliptext list will only be usable if that particular Cliptext list is loaded. However, since the Keys.ini file is a Cliptext list, you can assign shortcut keys to Cliptexts that will be accessible all the time. Read more about the Keys.ini file here.

        The #Shortcut code can be divided into two parts. The first number (2 in the example above) is the state of the Shift+Ctrl+Alt keys. The Shift key equals 1, the Ctrl key equals 2 and the Alt key equals 4. For instance, if the Shift AND the Ctrl keys should be pressed, then the number will be 3 (1+2). As a result, the accepted range is between 0 (no control keys should be pressed) and 7 (1+2+4, or Shift+Ctrl+Alt should all be pressed).

        The other number, after the "+" sign, is the key code number. Key A to Z equals 65 to 90, key 1 to 9 equals 48 to 57, and F1 to F12 equals 112 to 123. You can always look up the keycode for a certain key by selecting the Shortcuts tab in the Options window.

        If any shortcut in a Cliptext file is assigned to a menu command (by using the #Menu code), that shortcut will also be displayed in the menu itself, provided another shortcut isn't already assigned to that menu command.

      The Loaded Macros List

        This Cliptext list is always available, whether you have Cliptext files in the working directory of Texturizer or not. The list simply displays all macros that are loaded in the Macro menu. If you click on a macro in the list, that macro will be played in Texturizer. This is a non-configurable Cliptext list.

      The Bookmarks List

        This Cliptext list is always available, whether you have Cliptext files in the working directory of Texturizer or not. The list simply displays all bookmarks stored for the current document. If you click on a bookmark in the list, the cursor will jump to that bookmark in the document. If you right-click on a bookmark in the list, the context sensitive menu will also allow you to clear the bookmark. This is a non-configurable Cliptext list.

      Complete List Of Cliptext Codes

        This is a list of all available Cliptext codes in Texturizer.

        Code Description
        # Line comment
        #File Used if you want to insert a whole file
        #Macro Used to include a macro directly in the Cliptext list
        #MacroFile Points to a macro file
        #Menu Used primary in the Keys.ini and Toolbar.ini files to specify menu commands.
        #Shortcut Specifies the keyboard shortcut assigned to this Cliptext command
        #Sort Indicates if the list should be sorted or not
        #T The text to display (e.g. the caption) in the list
        #Title The title of the Cliptext list
        |#| Specifies the cursor position after the text has been inserted
        |#| ... |#| When two |#| codes are used, the text between them will be selected
        |n Used with the #MacroFile code, to specify the macro to play in the specified macro file
           

        In addition to these codes, all Cliptext Variables are allowed.

      Cliptext Variables

        Some features in Texturizer uses Cliptext Variables. The most common features to use these variables in are Find/Replace and Cliptext lists. The idea of a Cliptext Variable is to be able to express more than just plain text in a text string. Any valid variable will be replaced with its 'actual' meaning. The codes currently available are:

        Code Actual Text
        \N CR/LF (Line terminator; carriage return and line feed)
        \T Tab
        \C Clipboard Content
        \S Selected Text
        \\ \
        \# #
        \=LongDate Long Date Format
        \=ShortDate Short Date Format
        \=LongTime Long Time Format
        \=ShortTime Short Time Format
        \=File The fully qualified filename of the current document
        \=FilePath The drive and directory of the current document
        \=FileName The simple filename of the current document
        \=DriveName The drive of the current document
        \=PathName The directory of the current document, without the drive
        \=FileTitle The simple filename of the current document, without the extension
        \=FileExt The file extension of the current document, without the period
        \=WinPath The path to your computer's Windows directory
        \=SysPath The path to your computer's system directory
        \=TempPath The path to your computer's temporary directory
        \=ShortFile The short fully qualified filename of the current document
        \=ShortFilePath The short drive and directory of the current document
        \=ShortFileName The short simple filename of the current document
        \=ShortPathName The short directory of the current document, without the drive
        \=ShortFileTitle The short simple filename of the current document, without the extension
        \=ShortFileExt The short file extension of the current document, without the period
        \=ShortWinPath The short path to your computer's Windows directory
        \=ShortSysPath The short path to your computer's system directory
        \=ShortTempPath  The short path to your computer's temporary directory
        \=Stringn    User Defined String, where n is a number between 0 and 9
           

        This means that if you use the Cliptext Variables option and enters "\c" in the Find window, Texturizer will not search for a backslash followed by a c, but for the content of the Clipboard.


Syntax Highlighting

    Anyone into programming knows that syntax highlighting, a.k.a. code coloring, is extremely useful. It is a feature that put colors on keywords in specified document types so they become more readable. For example, the Cliptext file examples above are syntax highlighted to make them easier to understand. Another example is HTML files, which become much more easy to work with if the HTML tags are colored. Of course, different programming languages have different sets of keywords that should be colored. Texturizer has a built-in syntax highlighter that is easy to configure to any language. This section will discuss how to add new languages or modify existing languages in Texturizer. All other options for the syntax highlighter, such as which colors to use, are accessible from the Syntax tab in the Options window.

    Syntax Highlighting files must be located in the Texturizer directory and have the .stx file extension. This is an example of how a STX file can look like:

      # Example of a Syntax Highlighting file (for C/C++)
      #Delimiters=\n\t ,(){}[]-+*%/="'~!&|\\<>?:;.#

      #DelimiterOn1='
      #DelimiterOff1='
      #EscapeCharacter1=\
      #DelimiterOn2="
      #DelimiterOff2="
      #EscapeCharacter2=\

      #LineComment1=//
      #BlockCommentOn1=/*
      #BlockCommentOff1=*/
      #Case=y

      #Keyword
      auto
      bool
      break
      case
      catch
      char
      cerr
      [...]

      #Keyword
      define
      error
      include
      elseif
      if
      line
      else
      [...]

    The #Delimiters property specifies which characters that should be treated as valid keyword delimiters. A keyword will not be highlighted if it's not separated by a character specified here. Also, the start string of block delimiters (see below) must be separated with one of these characters. Note that \n means end of line, \t means tab and \\ means backslash.

    #DelimiterOn1 and #DelimiterOff1 specifies text blocks that will be colored. Any text starting with #DelimiterOn1 will be highlighted up to, and including, the text in #DelimiterOff1. Up to four block delimiters can be used (#DelimiterOn1 to #DelimiterOn4).

    There is also an alternative block delimiter called #TypeBDelimiter. The difference is that this type will highlight text starting with #TypeBDelimiterOn1 up to, and including, the first occurrence of any character specified in #TypeBDelimiterOff1. For instance, you can specify to color strings that starts with "-->" and ends with a space, tab or hard return (which would be " \t\n"). As with the normal block delimiter, up to four unique Type B delimiters can be used.

    For languages like C++ and Java, strings are enclosed in "quotation marks". Inside a string, if the quotation character must be used, a backslash preceeds it to indicate that this is not the end of the string. For example, the string: "This is a \"STRING\"!" is a valid C++/Java string. The #EscapeCharacter[1-4] property can specify this "escape character" (in this case a backslash) that the STX engine should ignore. Each normal delimiter (#Delimiter 1 to 4) can have an escape character, but not TypeB delimiters.

    Two #LineComment codes and two #BlockComment codes can be used to specify the comment characters in the language. As you can see in the example above, "//" is the line comment in C++, which means that any text after these characters will be treated as a comment (i.e. ignored by the compiler). In Texturizer Cliptext files, the line comment is "# " (a line starting with # followed by a space).

    Some languages are case sensitive, such as C/C++. For these languages, the #Case property must be set to "y". The default is no case sensitivity, so if the language is not case sensitive, this property does not have to be set.

    If block delimiters are used (#Delimiter and #TypeBDelimiter), then the text between On and Off will be colored with that delimiter color. Any keywords in that block will be ignored by default. However, if the language needs to color keywords within block delimiters too, use the #KeywordInDelimiter property. For instance, if you want keywords to be colored inside #TypeBDelimiter2, use #KeywordInTypeBDelimiter2=y.

    It is also possible to specify an offset for the start and end of the delimiters. For instance, you want to color text starting with "-->", and ending with "<--", but the arrows should not be colored; only the text between them. In these cases, use the #OffsetDelimiterOn and #OffsetDelimiterOff properties to specify an integer offset, either positive or negative. For the example with the arrows above, use the following code:

      #DelimiterOn1=-->
      #DelimiterOff1=<--
      #OffsetDelimiterOn1=3
      #OffsetDelimiterOff1=-3

    After these initial settings, any keywords can be listed after the #Keyword code. Only one keyword may exist per line, which allows spaces and tabs in the keywords. The keywords after the first #Keyword code will be colored with the color specified as Keyword Group 1. To proceed to keyword group 2, enter #Keyword again and put the keywords for group 2 below the code. Up to six keyword groups with different colors can be used.

    STX files are using part of the Cliptext Variables, namely "\n", "\t", "\#" and "\\". This means that a keyword can contain new line characters, which is the only reason for this Cliptext Variables conversion. Note that "\t" is not needed (but supported) since the tab character can be used directly anyway. However, it can increase readability to use the Cliptest Variable instead of the actual tab character.


Complete Word

    The Complete Word functionality in Texturizer works pretty much the same way as in Microsoft Visual Studio. Any serious programmer knows how to take advantage of this timesaving feature, but it's actually very useful for your everyday purposes as well.

    Basically, the Complete Word feature lets you complete a word that you are about to type. For instance, you begin typing "Tex", and then use Complete Word to automatically print the full name "Texturizer".

    In Texturizer, you have complete control over which words that should be completed, and you can add or remove words with ease. You can even use different word lists for different file types! If you edit a C++ file, a list of common keywords and commands will be available, and if you edit a Visual Basic file, the VB commands will be used instead. All of this is completely configurable.

      How It Works

        All words that can be completed are stored in Complete Word Files (*.cwf). The most important file is called Global.cwf. This file contains words that will be available from any file type edited in Texturizer. An additional cwf file is also loaded, but which one depends on the file type edited. For example, if you open a C++ file (*.cpp), C++.cwf will be used. If no particular cwf file is specified for the current file type, Default.cwf will be used.

        This means that if you add a word to Global.cwf, it will be available from all file types, but if you add a word to <Filetype>.cwf, it will only be available for the file types that use that particular cwf file.

        Complete Word Files works the same way as Cliptext Files. Each word starts with the #T= keyword, followed by the text that Texturizer should look for to complete. The line(s) under specifies what should be inserted if you complete the word. Normally, this would be the same word as the text after the #T= keyword, which would make a second row obsolete. However, Texturizer gives you the ability to insert something else than what is displayed in the list of words to complete. A good example of when this could be used is if you type "www.tex", and then completes the word to "http://www.texturizer.net". Even if you started by typing "www.", the actual word that was completed started with "http://".

        Since cwf files are Cliptext based, you can also insert other things than plain text. For instance, the current time/date, filename or path! A good start is to add your name, e-mail address and home page URL to Global.cwf. This will definitely save you time when editing your web pages!

      How Do I Do It?

        To complete a partial word, just select Complete Word from the Edit menu. By default, the keyboard shortcut for this menu command is Ctrl+Space. This is the shortcut used in Microsoft Visual Studio. If the word that you type only matches one of the words in the wordlist, the word will be completed instantly. If more than one word matches, a list of the words in the word list will be displayed. Select a word from the list using the keyboard or mouse, and press Enter or Tab (or click the word with the mouse) to select it. To edit the word lists or change the word list used for specific file types, use the options available in the Tools menu.


Sound Events

    Although not completely obvious, Texturizer includes support for custom sound events. All sounds are changed in the Sound Properties window in the Control Panel, i.e. not in Texturizer itself. There you will find all supported events that can have sounds. The most interesting events are probably Key Press, Enter Key, Backspace Key and Space Key. This allows you to play sounds when you type some text in a document, for instance, the sound from a typewriter!

    By default, no particular sound events are specified. The default Windows sounds are used.


The Status Bar

    The status bar is the info field at the bottom of the main window in Texturizer, which displays useful information about the edited file.

    The first two panels of the status bar display the current date and time. After these panels, the general information panel resides, followed by the position panel. Here you will be able to see where in the document the cursor is; the line, the column and the character position. The character position is the offset from the beginning of the file. After that panel comes the file size panel. It displays the current size of the file in bytes. If part of the text is selected, it will display the size of the selection in bytes. Hint: If you hover the mouse pointer over the file size field when text is selected, you can see the file size in the tool tip text!

    After the file size panel, the file encoding is displayed. This is either ANSI or Unicode. Hint: You can change the encoding of the file by double clicking on the encoding panel. Read more about Unicode and Texturizer here.

    Finally, three small indicators are displayed in the status bar. The first one displays the format of the file when it was loaded. The formats are DOS, UNIX, MAC, RTF or BIN. BIN indicates that the file contains null characters and that it hasn't been converted when loaded. RTF indicates that the file was converted from Rich Text Format to plain text when loading. Hint: You can change the format of the file by double clicking on the format panel. It will cycle through the formats in the following order: DOS - UNIX - MAC. However, it will only affect the file on disk when you save it. Note that changing the file format is only meaningful if the Preserve Original File Format option is enabled. Otherwise, Texturizer will always save to a specified format, regardless of the format when loading the file.

    The second indicator is the state of the Insert key on your keyboard, either Insert or Overwrite. The last indicator displays the state of the Caps Lock key. It is lit if Caps Lock is on.

    Since the information in the status bar is updated every time the text is modified, it can slow down the performance of Texturizer when editing very large files. If you are suffering from poor performance when editing files, you should turn off the status bar in the View menu.


Windows In Texturizer

    Options Window

      General Tab

        The General tab contains miscellaneous options for Texturizer.

        Editor For Binary Files

          Here you can specify which editor to use for binary files. Click on the Browse button to locate the program, or enter the name directly in the text field.

          Always Ask

            If this option is selected, you will be asked when a binary file is opened. Choose between opening the file in Texturizer or the other specified editor.

          Auto Launch Editor

            If this option is selected, you will not see a dialog when you are trying to open a binary file in Texturizer; the file will be opened in the specified editor automatically.

          Always Use Texturizer

            If this option is selected, all files will be opened directly in Texturizer.

        Auto Indent

          Check this option to turn on the Automatic Line Indentation. If spaces or tabs indent the line you are editing, the next line will have the same indentation when you press Enter.

        Auto Indent Characters

          You can also specify which characters that should be automatically indented here. The default is tabs, spaces and asterisks. Note that the string uses Cliptext Variables to specify the tab character ("\T").

        Number of Recent Files

          This is the number of recent files that Texturizer will display in the Recent Files list (1-36).

        Number of Undo Levels

          This is the number of actions that Texturizer will remember, so you can undo or redo them when you want to. I recommend that you set this to the maximum value 32767. The lower the number, the less memory is used.

        Tab Width

          Here you specify the width of tab characters in Texturizer. The width is measured in space characters.

        Convert New Tabs To n Spaces

          If this option is checked, each time you press the tab key, the tab will be converted to the number of spaces you specify. This will not affect tabs that are already in the text; it only applies when you press the tab key.

        Save Workspace

          Enable this option if you want Texturizer to automatically load any files you were working on the last time you closed the program. It will even remember which file that was active and where in the document(s) the cursor was.

        Enable Sound Events

          If this checkbox is enabled, you can use the Sound Properties in the Control Panel to add sounds to certain events in Texturizer, such as when you are saving a document. Clearing this option will not remove the sound events from the Control Panel, it will only disable the playback of sounds in Texturizer.

        Change Sounds

          Press this button to open the Sounds and Multimedia applet of the Control Panel. Here you will be able to change all sound events supported in Texturizer.

        Remember Last Opened Directory

          Makes Texturizer remember the most recently used directory each time you use the Save As/Open File dialog.

        Specify Default Directory

          If you don't want Texturizer to remember the last opened directory, you can specify a default directory here.

      Files Tab

        The Files tab contains options for saving and loading of files.

        File Format

          When you open a file in Texturizer, it will detect if it is a DOS, Macintosh or a UNIX file. Here you can specify the format to use when saving files back to disk.

          Preserve Original File Format

            This is the default option. Files opened in Texturizer will be saved using the format they had when they were loaded, as indicated in the status bar.

          Always Save In DOS Format

            If you select this option, any files you load, including Macintosh and UNIX files will be saved to DOS format, which is the standard file format in Windows.

          Always Save In Macintosh Format

            If you choose this option, any files you load, including DOS and UNIX files will be saved to Macintosh format. This may make the file unreadable for some Windows applications.

          Always Save In UNIX Format

            If you select this option, any files you load, including DOS and Macintosh files will be saved to UNIX format. This may make the file unreadable for some Windows applications.

        Backup Files Before Saving

          When saving a file, Texturizer can backup the original file before overwriting it with the new version. Check this checkbox to enable this feature.

          Backup File Name

            Specify the name of the backup file here. The five presets are using Cliptext Variables to specify the format. This allows for a very flexible way of naming the backup files. Of course, you can customize the backup file name to fit your needs.

        Auto Save Files Every n Minutes

          If this option is enabled, Texturizer will save any modified file every n minutes. Only files that were loaded from disk will be saved.

        Ask before opening files larger than n MB

          If this option is enabled, Texturizer will warn you when you try to open files larger than n megabytes. This can be useful to avoid opening very large files, which can almost appear to lock Texturizer up while loading.

      Appearance Tab

        Mode

          Select between two modes in Texturizer:

          Tab Style

            The default mode used in Texturizer. All documents are opened in the same window, with a tab for each file. If you want to open a new window, select New Window in the View menu or use the /new parameter in the command-line.

          Notepad Style

            If you prefer having each document opened in separate windows, use this mode instead. Turn off the tray icon, the toolbar and the status bar, and change the font to Fixedsys, 9pt, and you will come as close to the Notepad look and feel as possible!

            Note that this mode will launch each opened file as a separate process, which eventually will consume a lot of memory. The Tab Style is more memory efficient and is the recommended mode to use.

        Notification Icon

          Texturizer can be displayed in the notification area, but you can turn it off if you don't want to use that feature.

          Show Icon in Notification Area

            Check this option to display an icon in the notification area.

          Remove from Task Bar when Minimized

            If the notification icon is activated, this option will hide Texturizer when you minimize the program, to free up space on the task bar.

          Keep Running in the Notification Area

            If you close Texturizer and this option is checked, the program will remain loaded in memory. This will increase the speed when starting Texturizer again dramatically. To close the program completely, right click on the notification icon and select Exit, or select Exit in the File menu.

        Language

          Texturizer is capable of displaying its menus, dialogs and messages in other languages. Currently, English and Swedish are available, but more languages will probably be added as soon as a translation is completed. You can download Texturizer Language Packs from www.texturizer.net. If you're interested to translate Texturizer into your language, please send us an e-mail.

        Title Format

          Select the appearance of the title bar in Texturizer you prefer. The title bar can display the file name before or after "Texturizer" and you can also choose between the whole file name (including the path) and just the file title. Texturizer can even display the file name only, without the name Texturizer!

        Always On Top

          Check this option if you want to view Texturizer on top of other programs.

        Use Single Row for the File Tabs

          If you are using Tab Style, all files will be opened in a separate file tab. If there are more tabs than can fit on one row, Texturizer normally splits the tab strip into several rows. If you select this option, however, all tabs will be displayed on the same row. If the tabs exceed the window width, two small arrow buttons will be displayed on the right side of the tab strip, allowing you to scroll through the file tabs.

        Change Font

          Changes the font used in Texturizer. The default font is Courier New, but if you want to maintain the Notepad look and feel, you should change the font to Fixedsys. It is strongly recommended to use a fixed width font.

      Insert Tab

        User Defined Strings

          Here you specify the contents of the ten user defined strings that are insertable in the text. The text strings are located in the Insert menu.

        Time/Date Format

          Here you specify the format of the time or date you want to use. Insert the current time/date in the text by selecting it in the Insert menu or by pressing Shift+F5.

        Use Single Click In Cliptext Window

          Cliptexts can be inserted into your documents with just one click if you check this option. The default mode is to use double clicks.

      Filter Tab

        In this tab you can change the appearance of the Open/Save dialog in Texturizer, by specifying the file types to be displayed.

        Move Up

          Moves the currently selected filter item up one step.

        Move Down

          Moves the currently selected filter item down one step.

        Remove

          Removes the currently selected filter item from the list. This means that this filter item will not be selectable in the Open/Save dialog.

        Restore All

          This will restore all filters to the default settings. Use this if you have messed up and want to return to the way it was when you first used Texturizer.

        Filter Description

          This is the friendly description of the current filter that will be displayed in the drop down list in the Open/Save dialog. To change the description for the current filter, simply change the text in File Description and press OK or Apply (or select another filter).

        Filter

          This is the actual filter for the currently selected filter item. An example of a filter is "*.txt", which displays text files. If you want to display different file types at the same time, separate each file type with a semicolon (e.g. "*.txt;*.ini"). Note that the quotation marks in the examples shall not be included.

        Add

          Press this button to add a new filter item.

      Associate Tab

        In this tab you can associate file types to Texturizer. This means that Texturizer will open that file type if you double click on them.

        Add Texturizer to Windows System Menu

          Check this option to add Texturizer to the global system menu in Windows. When you right click on a file in Explorer, you will be able to select Open with Texturizer, which will open that file in Texturizer, no matter what kind of file type it is.

        Add

          This button will let you associate a file type with Texturizer that is not already in the list of available file types.

        File Type Extension

          After pressing the Add button, enter the file type extension here. Do not include the dot before the file extension! An example of a file extension is "txt".

        File Type Description

          Here you can change the description for any file type that is listed. An example of a description is "Text File".

      Printer Tab

        In this tab you can specify the header, the footer and the margins when printing a file.

        Margins (millimeters)

          Specify the margins of the paper to print on, i.e. the distances from the edge of the paper to the text.

        Header

          Here you specify what should be printed on the top of the page. There are several variables that you can enter in the header, for example, %F prints the file name of the printed document. Note that you can specify three parts of the header: the left aligned, the centered and the right aligned part.

        Footer

          Here you specify what should be printed on the bottom of the page. There are several variables that you can enter in the footer, for example, %P prints the current page number. Note that you can specify three parts of the footer: the left aligned, the centered and the right aligned part.

        Variable Description

          This is the complete list of variables that can be used in the header or the footer of the page.

        Change Font

          Press this button to change the font used when printing a document.

        Preserve Document Colors

          If this option is enabled, the colors will be the same on paper as they are on screen, which means that any colored text will be colored on paper too. The color sample below will, however, still be used as the header and footer color. Of course, the color options will have no effect if you don't have a color printer installed.

        Use This Color

          If this option is enabled, all text will be printed with the specified color, regardless of the syntax highlighting settings for the file. Click on the color sample to change the color used when printing.

      Shortcuts Tab

        In this tab, you can add, modify and delete all keyboard shortcuts used in Texturizer. You can assign more than just menu commands to a shortcut key. For instance, you can assign Cliptext commands and macros.

        The keyboard shortcuts support in Texturizer is very powerful and allows you to assign any action to any key. Basically, you could re-map the whole keyboard (which of course would make it harder to use Texturizer!).

        Shortcuts in use

          This is the list of the shortcuts that are currently used in Texturizer. Click on any shortcut in the list to modify it.

        Shortcut Key

          Use this text field to press the keystroke you want to use for the selected command. Texturizer will then update the Shift, Ctrl, Alt and KeyCode for the shortcut automatically.

        Caption

          This is the text that will be displayed next to the menu command, provided you are using the key shortcut for a menu command. It is also to let you know what you just pressed!

        Key Code

          This is the actual key code for the keystroke in use. Only edit this field if you know the key code. Otherwise, use the Shortcut Key field to edit the shortcut.

        Shift, Ctrl, Alt

          If any of these boxes are checked, those keys will be used in the keyboard shortcut. They are updated automatically if you use the Shortcut Key field.

        Cliptext Data

          This is the action that will be performed when you press the keystroke. You can select any of the predefined menu commands in the list, or you can enter any Cliptext data you want, for instance, a macro or just plain text.

        Predefined Actions

          All menu commands are already predefined in this list, so you don't have to know them all by heart! Just select a command in this list, and it will be used for the shortcut.

        Move Up

          Moves the selected shortcut up one step in the list. If you are using several key shortcuts for the same menu command, the first one in the list will be displayed in the actual menu item, which is why there is this possibility to move around the shortcuts.

        Move Down

          Moves the selected shortcut down one step in the list, which basically means that it gets a lower priority.

        Add

          Adds a new keyboard shortcut to the list.

        Remove

          Removes the selected keyboard shortcut from the list.

        Restore All

          Press this button if you want to restore all keyboard shortcuts as they were when installing Texturizer. Note that the changes will still not be saved until you press OK or Apply in the Options window.

      Toolbar Tab

        Here you are able to customize the toolbar to meet your editing requirements. You can assign more than just menu commands to a toolbar button. For instance, you can insert your signature or something similar, when clicking on the button.

        Predefined Buttons

          This is the list of the buttons available in Texturizer. Double clicking on a list item will add that button to the toolbar. These pre-defined buttons have their own icons (the icon name is displayed above the icon preview image and can be changed to another built-in icon or an external .ico/.bmp/.jpg/.gif file). Not all menu commands are included in this list, but you can assign any menu command, macro or Cliptext to a button anyway. To do this, select the [Empty] button and add it, then check the Cliptext code for the menu command you want to assign to a button (all Cliptext codes are displayed after each menu item in the Menu Reference) and use an icon of your choice.

        Buttons Currently Used

          This is the list of buttons currently used in the toolbar. Select a button to change its properties and double-click a button to remove it from the toolbar.

        Add

          Press this button to add the selected toolbar button in the list of predefined buttons to the list of buttons currently used. It will be inserted next to the selected button.

        Remove

          Pressing this button will remove the selected button from the list of currently used buttons.

        Restore All

          Use this command if you want to restore the toolbar buttons to the state they were when you installed Texturizer.

        Selected Button

          The controls in this frame represent the state of the currently selected button in use.

          Tool Tip Text

            This property is the text that will be displayed when pointing at the button with the mouse. Note that if this text field is left empty and the button is associated with a menu item, the caption of that menu command will be displayed in the tool tip. This is useful since the menu caption can change depending on the current status of the menu item and the current language pack selected.

          Cliptext Data

            This is the command that will be performed when clicking the toolbar button. As with the keyboard shortcuts in Texturizer, the toolbar is Cliptext based, so a toolbar button can do much more than just executing simple menu commands. For instance, you can create a button that will insert your e-mail by just entering your email in this text field. Or, you could have it running a macro by using the #MacroFile Cliptext command.

          Picture

            In this text field, you can either enter a path to an icon on your hard drive, or enter icons named after the menu command. For instance, the picture for the menu command File|New is called "FileNew". Not all menu commands have an icon, which is why only some of the menu commands are included in the list of predefined buttons. Although a button can perform any menu command, you will only be able to use the pictures designed for the predefined buttons.

            If you want to use your own icons, make sure that you choose 16x16 images. Otherwise, the button may not display properly. The supported formats are Icons (*.ico), Bitmaps (*.bmp), JPEG:s (*.jpg/*.jpeg), and Graphics Interchange Format (*.gif).

          Browse

            Lets you choose an icon to use for the selected button.

          Move Up/Down

            These buttons moves the selected button up or down in the list, e.g. to the left and right in the actual toolbar.

        Display Keyboard Shortcuts in Tool Tip

          If this option is checked, the currently assigned keyboard shortcut will be displayed when pointing the mouse over a button that is associated with a menu command (e.g. has a #Menu command as its Cliptext Data). If a Tool Tip Text is specified, this option has no effect.

      Syntax Tab

        This tab allows you to configure the syntax highlighting in Texturizer.

        Available Syntax Highlighting Languages

          This is the list of all installed STX files. Each file represents a syntax highlighting language, which can be configured individually. Select a language to view or change the settings for that language. In addition to all STX files, the list also contains <None>, which are for files that shouldn't be colored using a STX file. However, these files can still have underlined Internet links. All settings in the Syntax tab are specific for the selected STX language.

        Default Language

          If this option is selected, the language highlighted in the list will be the default language. This means that it will be used on all file types not specified in other STX languages.

        Highlight Internet Links

          If you select this option, Internet links (URLs) and e-mail addresses will be highlighted and underlined for this syntax language. You will also be able to double-click on the links to visit the link in the default browser.

        Highlight Automatically

          If this option is selected, Texturizer will highlight the file when displaying it, which is the default behavior.

        Settings

          Press this button to change the settings for the automatic syntax highlighting for the selected language. This will display another dialog with the available settings.

          Entire File At Once

            If this option is selected, Texturizer will highlight the whole file when displaying it. This can be very time consuming on large files. The color-coding can always be aborted by pressing Cancel in the small dialog that appears after a while.

          Visible Area Only

            This is the default setting. The automatic highlighter will only color the visible part of the document, and the number of lines above and below that portion you specify. If you scroll the document so that uncolored parts of the text become visible, Texturizer will automatically apply syntax highlighting on the new area as well.

          Plus n lines above and below

            This is the number of lines to color above and below the visible part of the document. The less lines to color, the faster the syntax highlighter will perform, but the more frequently it will have to update it.

          If file size is smaller than n MB/KB

            This setting will allow you to specify an upper limit of the file size when the automatic syntax highlighting should not be applied. If the file size is larger than the specified size, the only way to apply syntax highlighting will be to do it manually from the Tools menu.

        Default Colors

          When the <None> language is selected in the list of Available Syntax Highlighting Languages, you are able to specify default colors to use in all STX schemes. The Default Colors are the colors used by default in Texturizer. Changing colors here will affect all syntax highlighting languages if they don't have their own colors specified already. Change a color by choosing the requested color item from the list and then click on the color sample.

        Language Specific Colors

          If any other STX file but the <None> language is selected, colors specific for that particular language can be selected here. Change the colors used in the selected STX language by choosing the requested color item from the list and then click on the color sample.

        Windows Default

          This checkbox will set the color to the default color used in Windows for the background and text color in the <None> language. This will affect other STX files too, if those STX files have the Use Default option enabled.

        Use Default

          This option, used only by other languages than <None>, specifies whether or not to use the same colors as the <None> language. If it's not selected, the language will use it's own color(s). This allows you to use a completely different set of colors for a specific language.

        File Types Using This Language

          This list contains all file types that are using the selected STX language. For instance, if myfile.cpp file is opened in Texturizer and cpp is specified in this list, that STX language will be used for the file.

          Add

            Press this button to add a new file type to use for this STX language.

          Remove

            Press this button to remove the selected file type from the list.

          Selected File Type

            Here you are able to modify or enter new file types for this STX language.

      Advanced Tab

        This tab contains "advanced" options in Texturizer.

        Working Directory

          Normally, this path should be the same path as the program was installed in. This is where Texturizer searches for Syntax files, Cliptext lists, Macro files, etc. However, by specifying another directory, you could use a completely different set of settings for a particular user on a multi-user Windows system.

        Auto Load Macro File

          You can have one or more macro files loaded automatically on start up. Specify the macro file to be loaded here. Wildcards are allowed (e.g. "C:\Program Files\Texturizer\*.mac"). Press the Browse button to locate a macro file using a standard Open File dialog.

        Automatically Load And Save All Macros

          If you select this option, all loaded macros in the macro menu will be saved to a file (AutoLoad.mac) and load automatically when restarting Texturizer. This way, you will not have to remember if you saved the changes when altering the properties of a macro.

          If you uncheck this option, Texturizer can still load the file specified as the Auto Load Macro File, but it will not save any changes to a macro until you choose Save Macro As in the Macro menu.

        Global Hotkey

          Here you can specify a hotkey that will be used to restore Texturizer from the tray and bring the window on top of other programs, just as you clicked on the tray icon. This shortcut is recognized by Windows and can be used from any other program, as long as Texturizer is running. You can use key combinations like Ctrl+Shift+X or Win+B. The Win key is the key between Ctrl and Alt on modern keyboards. The default hotkey for Texturizer is Win+T (where T stands for Texturizer!).

    Properties Window

      This window is used to change properties for the selected file. It is similar to the standard file properties dialog in Windows. To open this window, select Properties from the File menu.

      Delete

        Click this button to send the file to the Recycle Bin. A delete confirmation dialog may be displayed, depending on your Recycle Bin settings. After deleting a file, Texturizer will ask you if you also want to close the opened document in Texturizer.

      Move/Rename

        Use this function to move the file to another location without having to close and re-open the file again. Just specify another file name or location and Texturizer will move the file for you.

      Save As

        If the file you are viewing the properties for is untitled, you can save it using this button.

      Format

        Here you are able to change the text format of the current file (PC/DOS, Unix or Macintosh format). A quicker way to change the format is to double-click on the format indicator in the status bar.

      Encoding

        Here you are able to change the encoding of the current file (ANSI or Unicode). A quicker way to change the format is to double-click on the encoding indicator in the status bar.

        Note: Texturizer has a limited Unicode support. It doesn't handle characters that do not exist in code page 1252 (ANSI - Latin I). These characters will be converted to the system default character (usually a questionmark) when displayed in Texturizer. Also, it cannot detect Big Endian Unicode files. The purpose of the Unicode support is to be able to display and edit native Windows 2000/XP text files, such as .reg files.

      Attributes

        As in the standard file properties dialog in Windows, you are able to change the file attributes in Texturizer. However, in Texturizer you have more control! For instance, you can even change the System attribute without hassle.

    Organize Favorites Window

      This window is used to organize your Favorites in Texturizer. Here you can add, remove, rename and change them just the way you want them to be.

      Favorites

        This is the list of the Favorites in Texturizer. Select the Favorite you want to update by clicking on it.

      Caption

        This is the text that will be displayed in the Favorites menu. For example: "My File"

      File Name(s) Or Folder

        This is the actual file or folder that the Favorite item will point to. You can specify one or more file names, separated by spaces and enclosed with quotation marks if the file names contain space characters. You can even use wildcards! Alternatively, you can specify a directory. If that is the case, Texturizer will open that folder in an Explorer window for you.

      Browse

        This will display an Open File dialog, which will allow you to locate the file(s) you want Texturizer to open when you click on the selected Favorite.

      Add

        Press this button to add a brand new Favorite file.

      Remove

        Pressing this button will delete the currently selected Favorite.

      Move Up/Down

        These buttons will move the selected Favorite up or down to fit your needs.

    Find/Replace Window

      This window is used to search for text in the document and optionally replace it with other text.

      Find what

        Enter the text that you want to find here.

      Replace with

        Enter the text that you want to replace the found text with here.

      Whole word only

        Check this option if you only want to find whole words. For instance, if you search for "Text" and have this option checked, "Texturizer" will be ignored, because the text is part of a bigger word.

      Match case

        With this option checked, Texturizer will match the case of the text. For instance, if you search for "TEXT" and have this option checked, "text" will be ignored.

      Direction

        Select the direction of the search. If All is selected, the search will start from the beginning of the document and search down through the document. If Down is selected, the search will start from the current cursor position and search down through the document. If Up is selected, the search will start from the current cursor position and search upwards. If the Scope is set to Selected Text, the All direction will start from the start of the selection. Note that the direction has no affect when performing a Replace All.

      Use Cliptext Variables

        When this option is enabled, you can search for other characters than just plain text. For instance, you can append the HTML code <b> at the end of each line by searching for \n (hard return) and replace it with <b>\n.

        Hint: Click on the small buttons next to the Find What and Replace With text fields to see a menu containing the Cliptext Variables. The variables currently available are listed here.

      Scope

        Entire Document

          When performing a Replace All, the whole document will be searched.

        Selected Text

          When performing a Replace All, only the current selection will be searched.

        All Documents

          If this option is selected, all documents will be searched.

      Find

        Starts searching for an occurrence of the text to find. If the text is found, it is highlighted.

      Count

        Counts the occurrences of the text to find in the specified scope.

      Replace

        Starts searching for an occurrence of the text to find, and if it is found, it is replaced by the text to replace with.

      Replace All

        Starts searching through the scope and replacing every occurrence of the searched text.

    Extend Selection Window

      The Extend Selection feature is used to extend the text selection in the document to one or more specified characters. It is useful when creating macros, but is somewhat hard to explain. I recommend that you try it for yourself.

      Extend Selection To: The specified character(s)

        If this option is selected, the selection will be extended to, and not including, the first occurrence of any of the character(s) specified in the text field.

      Extend Selection To: Any character but the specified character(s)

        If this option is selected, the selection will be extended to, and not including, the first occurrence of any character not specified in the text field.

      Search Upwards

        With this option checked, the selection will be extended to the first occurrence before the current cursor position.

      Use Cliptext Variables

        With this option activated, you can search for more than just plain text, as described in the Cliptext Variables section.

      Move Cursor Only

        When using this option, the Extend Selection command will not extend the selection to the specified character(s); it will just move the cursor to that position instead.

      Extend

        Press this button to extend the selection.

    Macro Properties Window

      This window let you change some properties for the current macro, such as the name.

      Macro Name

        Enter the name of the macro here.

      Keyboard Shortcut

        Shortcut Key

          Use this text field to press the keystroke you want to use for the selected command. Texturizer will then update the Shift, Ctrl, Alt and KeyCode for the shortcut automatically.

        Caption

          This is the text that will be displayed next to the menu command. It is also to let you know what you just pressed!

        Shift, Ctrl, Alt

          If any of these boxes are checked, those keys will be used in the keystroke. They are updated automatically if you use the Shortcut Key field.

        Key

          This is the actual key code for the keystroke in use. Only edit this field if you know the key code. Otherwise, use the Shortcut Key field to edit the shortcut.

      Stop macro if a Find/Replace string not found

        If a macro is executing and performing a Find/Replace where no occurrences were found, the macro will be stopped with this option checked. This is useful if the macro will modify the found occurrence of the text.

      Search through the whole document if no text is selected and the current scope is Selected Text

        If a macro is being executed and performs a Find/Replace in the selected text, and no text is selected, this option makes the Find/Replace change scope to the entire document instead. This means that if text is selected, the Find/Replace will be performed within the selected text, but if no text is selected, the Find/Replace will be performed on the whole document.

    Document List Window

      The Document List Window lists the loaded documents in Texturizer and allow you to perform basic tasks on several documents at once. Select more than one document by holding down the Ctrl key and click the filename of the document that you want to select. The Document List can be visible while still editing the documents in Texturizer.

      There are four picture buttons in the window, described below.

      Activate Document

        Pressing this button will activate the selected document.

      Save Document(s)

        Saves the selected document(s) if they are modified.

      Close Document(s)

        Closes the selected document(s). You will be asked to save any modified documents first.

      Document Properties


Menu Reference

    This section of the User's Guide lists all menu commands in Texturizer and explain what they do.

    Below each menu name, you will see the Cliptext code associated with that menu command. This means that you can use that Cliptext code in your macros, Cliptext files, keyboard shortcuts and toolbar buttons. Note that Cliptext codes are not case sensitive, so #menu=filenew is equal to #Menu=FileNew.

    File Menu

    Cliptext code: #Menu=File

      New

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileNew

        Creates a brand new text document!

      Open

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileOpen

        Opens one or more files from disk. You will see an Open Dialog where you can select the file(s), using the customizable Open/Save dialog filters.

        If you are opening a Rich Text Format file (*.rtf), you will see a dialog asking if you want to convert the file to plain text before reading it in Texturizer. If you select Yes, you will only see the actual text in the RTF file; the RTF format data will be removed. This will not affect the saved file on disk, unless you choose to save the file again. If you want to keep the RTF format of the original file, you should choose Save As and save it as a new file.

      Quick Open

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileQuickOpen

        This may be a quicker way to open one or more files at the same time. Here you can use wild-cards like *.txt, which will open all text files at the specified directory.

      Favorites

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileFavorites, #Menu=FileFavorites0 - #Menu=FileFavorites9

        In Texturizer, you can create your own list of files or folders that you use frequently. Simply click on a file name in the Favorites list to open that file in Texturizer.

        Add To Favorites

        Cliptext code: #Menu=FileFavoritesAdd

          Adds the currently opened document to your Favorites.

        Add All To Favorites

        Cliptext code: #Menu=FileFavoritesAddAll

          Makes all currently opened documents one Favorite item. This means that you will be able to open all these files at once simply by selecting that Favorite.

        Organize Favorites

        Cliptext code: #Menu=FileFavoritesOrganize

          Opens the Organize Favorites window, where you can add, remove, change and rename your Favorites.

      Recent Files

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileRecent, #Menu=FileRecent0 - #Menu=FileRecent9

        This is a list of the most recently used files in Texturizer. Click on a file name to instantly open that file.

        Remove Obsolete Files

        Cliptext code: #Menu=FileRecentRemoveObsolete

          Removes any files in the Recent Files list that doesn't exist anymore. This may include files on removable storages such as a floppy disk.

        Clear Recent Files List

        Cliptext code: #Menu=FileRecentClear

          Removes all the files from the Recent Files list.

      Open Containing Folder

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileOpenContainingFolder

        Opens the containing folder of the current file. For example, if you are editing C:\Windows\System.ini, the directory C:\Windows will be opened. This feature is only available for saved files.

      Open With Associated

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileOpenAssociated

        This feature starts the program associated with the file type of the current document. For example, if you are editing a HTML file, the default browser will be launched with the current file, and if you are editing a batch file, that file will be executed.

      Close

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileClose

        Closes the opened file. If the file is modified, you will be asked to save the file.

      Close All

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileCloseAll

        Closes all opened files. If a file is modified, you will be asked to save that file.

      Save

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileSave

        Saves the opened file to disk. If the file is untitled, you will see a Save As Dialog, where you can specify the file name.

      Save All

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileSaveAll

        Saves all opened files to disk. If a file is untitled, you will see a Save As Dialog, where you can specify the file name.

      Save As

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileSaveAs

        Saves the opened file to disk, using the file name you select in the Save As Dialog.

      Save Selection As

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileSaveSelectionAs

        Saves only the selected text to disk, using the file name you specify in the Save As Dialog. This command is only available if some text is selected.

      Send E-mail

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileSendEmail

        Sends the current document to the default e-mail program. The document will become the body text in the e-mail message. This way, you can compose your e-mail messages in Texturizer and then send it using your favorite e-mail client. Note: This feature only works with Outlook/Outlook Express. (It works by sending the current document as a file to the registered handler of *.eml files.)

      Export

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileExport

        Texturizer can export text files to UNIX and Macintosh format, so the files can be read in these operating systems. Note that Texturizer will import Macintosh and UNIX files to the Windows format automatically when they are opened.

        Macintosh

        Cliptext code: #Menu=FileExportMacintosh

          This will save the current document as a new file in Macintosh format (carriage returns only).

        UNIX

        Cliptext code: #Menu=FileExportUNIX

          This will save the current document as a new file in UNIX format (line feeds only), which will make the file readable on UNIX systems, such as Linux.

        Rich Text Format

        Cliptext code: #Menu=FileExportRTF

          This will save the file in Rich Text Format, which will preserve the colors in the document. This is useful if you want to keep the syntax highlighting colors when sharing code with other people. Note that Texturizer will not load formatted RTF documents without stripping off the RTF codes first, so this command is only useful if you plan to use the document in another word processor.

      Revert

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileRevert

        Restores a modified file to the original version stored on disk. This command is only available if the file was loaded from a disk and the document has been modified.

      Insert File

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileInsertFile

        Inserts a file of your choice at the current cursor position. You will see an Open Dialog where you can select the file, using the customizable filters.

      Printer Setup

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FilePrinterSetup

        Changes the printer settings, such as which printer to use, paper source, orientation, etc.

      Page Setup

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FilePageSetup

        Opens the Printer tab in the Options window, where you can specify the font, header, footer and the margins.

      Print

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FilePrint

        Displays the Print dialog where you can specify how many copies you want to print and if you want to print only the selected text. Press OK to print the file.

      Properties

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileProperties

      Exit

      Cliptext code: #Menu=FileExit

        Prompts to save any modified file and close Texturizer completely.

    Edit Menu

    Cliptext code: #Menu=Edit

      Undo

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditUndo

        Undo the last action. Texturizer can undo up to 32767 actions, including all conversions, find/replace and other commands available. The number of undo levels can be specified in the Options window.

      Redo

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditRedo

        Redo the last Undo command. This command is only available if you have used the Undo command one or more times.

      Cut

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditCut

        Cuts the selected text from the document and stores it in the Windows Clipboard. Paste the text somewhere else by using the Paste command.

      Copy

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditCopy

        Copies the selected text to the Windows Clipboard, without removing it from the document. Paste the text somewhere else by using the Paste command.

      Paste

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditPaste

        Pastes the text in the Windows Clipboard to the current cursor position. If no text is stored in the Windows Clipboard, nothing will be pasted into the document.

      Special Cut

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSpecialCut

        Append After Clipboard

        Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSpecialCutAppendAfter

          Cuts the selected text from the document and appends it to the end of the Windows Clipboard.

        Append Before Clipboard

        Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSpecialCutAppendBefore

          Cuts the selected text from the document and appends it to the beginning of the Windows Clipboard.

        Cut Rich Text Format

        Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSpecialCutRTF

          Cuts the selected text from the document and stores it as Rich Text Format in the Windows Clipboard. The difference from the normal Cut command is that any fonts and colors used in Texturizer will also be saved in the Clipboard.

      Special Copy

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSpecialCopy

        Append After Clipboard

        Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSpecialCopyAppendAfter

          Copies the selected text in the document and appends it to the end of the Windows Clipboard.

        Append Before Clipboard

        Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSpecialCopyAppendBefore

          Copies the selected text in the document and appends it to the beginning of the Windows Clipboard.

        Copy Rich Text Format

        Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSpecialCopyRTF

          Copies the selected text and stores it as Rich Text Format in the Windows Clipboard. The difference from the normal Copy command is that any fonts and colors used in Texturizer will also be saved in the Clipboard.

      Increase Indent

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditIncreaseIndent

        Indents the selected text by a tab. If you have the option to replace new tabs with spaces enabled, the text will be indented by the number of spaces specified.

        Hint: If more than one line is selected, you can indent the text simply by pressing the Tab key!

      Decrease Indent

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditDecreaseIndent

        Decreases the indent of the selected text by a tab. If you have the option to replace new tabs with spaces enabled, this function will try to decrease a space character indentation.

        Hint: If more than one line is selected, you can unindent the text simply by pressing Shift+Tab!

      Delete Line

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditDeleteLine

        Deletes the current line.

      Select All

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditSelectAll

        Selects all text in the document.

      Delete

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditDelete

        Deletes the selected text.

      Complete Word

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditCompleteWord

        Activates the Complete Word command, which will complete the word that you are typing automatically. Read more about this feature here.

      Run

      Cliptext code: #Menu=EditRun

        If you have selected text, that selection can be run, as if you typed it in the Windows Run Dialog. For instance, you can select an Internet address and then select Run (or press F9) to open the web page in your default browser. Try it! If no text is selected, the current word will be used instead.

    View Menu

    Cliptext code: #Menu=View

      Menu

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ViewMenu

        If you uncheck this option, the menu bar will be hidden. This can be useful if you are running Texturizer on a low-resolution monitor and want to use as much space as possible for the document you are editing. To show the menu again, simply right click on the text and select View Menu.

      Toolbar

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ViewToolbar

        The toolbar is described in more detail here. If you don't want to see the toolbar, then uncheck this option to unload it. This will speed up the loading time and overall performance of Texturizer slightly.

      File Tabs

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ViewFileTabs

        You can choose to hide the file tabs in Texturizer, even if you use the Tab Style. You can still switch documents using the keyboard shortcuts (the default shortcuts are Ctrl+Tab and Shift+Ctrl+Tab to move to the next and previous document, respectively) or from the Windows menu. You can also use the Document List Window. This option is not visible if you use Notepad Style.

      Status Bar

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ViewStatusBar

        With this option checked, the status bar will be displayed at the bottom of the window. The status bar displays useful information, such as the file size, the current line position, date and time, and the status of the Caps Lock button and the Insert button. If you don't need that information, just uncheck this option and the status bar will be hidden. Read more about the status bar here.

      Full Screen

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ViewFullScreen

        The Full Screen mode automatically hides the toolbar, the status bar and the menu, and maximizes the window. Press Esc on the keyboard or right click the document and select Restore to turn off the Full Screen mode again.

      Word Wrap

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ViewWordWrap

        With this option checked, any text line that is longer than the text window will be wrapped. This usually makes it easier to read a document.

      New Window

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ViewNewWindow

        Starts another instance of Texturizer. This is the same as using the /new parameter in the command-line.

        Note that the new instance of Texturizer will not place itself in the system tray, even if you have that option enabled. It will only appear in the Explorer Task Bar. Also, if you close the second instance of Texturizer, it will always unload completely, regardless of the Keep Running in the Notification Area option.

    Insert Menu

    Cliptext code: #Menu=Insert

      Date/Time

      Cliptext code: #Menu=InsertDateTime

        Inserts the current date and time, using the format specified in the Insert tab in the Options window.

      Custom Strings

      Cliptext code: #Menu=InsertString, #Menu=InsertString0 - #Menu=InsertString9

        Inserts any of the ten custom text strings into the document. These text strings can also be inserted using the keyboard shortcuts, by holding the Ctrl key down and press the number representing the string. All strings are specified in the Options window.

      Cliptext

      Cliptext code: #Menu=InsertCliptext

        This opens the Cliptext Window, from which you can insert almost anything to the document, including whole files, and play macros. Read all about Cliptexts here.

    Search Menu

    Cliptext code: #Menu=Search

      Find

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchFind

      Find Next

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchFindNext

        Searches for the next occurrence of the specified text. Only available if the Find command has been used.

      Replace

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchReplace

        Searches for a specified text in the document and replaces it with another, using the options selected in the Find/Replace window.

      Replace Next

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchReplaceNext

        Replaces the next occurrence of the specified text. Only available if the Replace command has been used.

      Extend Selection

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchExtendSelection

        Selects the text from the current cursor position to the first occurrence of the specified text, specified in the Extend Selection window.

      Extend Next

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchExtendNext

        Extends the selection again, using the settings in the Extend Selection window. Only available if the Extend Selection command has been used.

      Remove Characters

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchRemoveCharacters

        With this feature, you can remove certain characters from a file simply by specifying them and press OK. You can select to remove all alpha or alphanumerical characters, or you can specify the characters manually. Select the "Keep the specified characters" checkbox, and the characters you select will be kept in the document, but all other characters will be deleted instead. Please note that this feature doesn't remove control characters such as carriage returns, tabulations, etc.

      Go To Line

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchGoToLine

        Use this feature to jump to a specific line in the document. You can specify the line number to go to, or you can select the last line, or the last character (end of document). The last option can be useful if you want to create a macro that adds some text to the end of the document. You can also move relative to the current line position by using + and -. For instance, you can move five lines upwards by typing -5.

      Go To Bookmark

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchBookmark, #Menu=SearchBookmark0 - #Menu=SearchBookmark9

        Displays a sub menu containing all bookmarks you have specified in the active document. Click on a bookmark to jump to that place in the document.

      Toggle Bookmark

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchToggleBookmark

        Use this command to turn the current cursor position into a bookmark. You can then jump back to this position in the document easily with just a few clicks. If the cursor is on a bookmark, this command will remove that bookmark again.

      Next Bookmark

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchNextBookmark

        Jumps to the next bookmark from the cursor position. If no bookmark was found below the cursor, it will go to the first bookmark in the document instead.

      Previous Bookmark

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchPreviousBookmark

        Jumps to the previous bookmark from the cursor position. If no bookmark was found before the cursor, it will go to the last bookmark in the document instead.

      Clear All Bookmarks

      Cliptext code: #Menu=SearchClearAllBookmarks

        Removes all bookmarks from the active document.

    Convert Menu

    Cliptext code: #Menu=Convert

      To Lower Case

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertLowerCase

        Converts the selected text to lower case characters. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      To Upper Case

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertUpperCase

        Converts the selected text to UPPER CASE CHARACTERS. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      Capitalize

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertCapitalize

        Converts the selected text to Capitalized Case Characters. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      Sentence Case

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertSentenceCase

        Converts the selected text to Sentence case. This means that the first letter in a sentence will be upper case and the rest will be lower case. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      Invert Case

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertInvertCase

        Converts the selected text to iNVERTED cASE cHARACTERS. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      CR/LF's To Wrap

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertCRLFsToWrap

        Converts hard returns (CR/LF's) to spaces. However, two returns following each other (i.e. section delimiters) will not be converted.

      Wrap To CR/LF's

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertWrapToCRLFs

        Converts wrapped text to hard returns (CR/LF's), either after a specified number of characters, or at the current window wrap.

      OEM To ANSI

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertOEMToANSI

        Files written in DOS don't have the same character table as normal Windows files. This command will convert such characters to the ANSI standard, which will make the text readable in Texturizer.

      ANSI To OEM

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertANSIToOEM

        If you have written a file in Texturizer (using the ANSI standard in Windows) and want it to be readable in DOS, then convert it using this command.

      Tabs To Spaces

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertTabsToSpaces

        This conversion will replace all existing tabulation characters in the text with normal spaces. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      Spaces To Tabs

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertSpacesToTabs

        This conversion will replace as many space characters as possible with tabulation characters. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      Trim Trailing Spaces

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertTrimTrailingSpaces

        This conversion will remove any spaces or tabs at the end of each line. If no text is selected, the whole document will be affected.

      Trim Preceding Spaces

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertTrimPrecedingSpaces

        This conversion will remove any spaces or tabs at the beginning of each line. If no text is selected, the whole document will be affected.

      Invert ANSI

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertInvertANSI

        Inverts the ANSI table so that the text becomes unreadable. A very simple way of encrypting text. Repeat the command to restore the original text again. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      Reverse Direction

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertReverseDirection

        Reverses the selected text. If no text is selected, the whole document will be reversed. Example of reversed text: rezirutxeT

      Rotate Alphabet

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertRotateAlphabet

        This function rotates the letters of the alphabet by the number you specify and is also known as a ROT-n conversion. This is said to be the first cryptographic algorithm and was used by Julius Caesar to send secret, military messages. Caesar shifted the alphabet by 3; a ROT-3 conversion. ROT-13 is used to make text that might offend people illegible on newsgroups. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

      Rotate ANSI

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ConvertRotateANSI

        This function is very similar to Rotate Alphabet, but with the difference that you can specify which characters to rotate. The boundaries must be specified with the equivalent ANSI code. If no text is selected, the whole document will be converted.

    Macro Menu

    Cliptext code: #Menu=Macro

      Play Macro

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroPlay

        Executes the selected macro once. Hold the F6 key pressed to loop the macro until you release the key again. Read more about macros here.

      Record New Macro

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroRecord

        Creates a new macro by recording the keystrokes and menu selections in Texturizer. Note that any mouse movements or selections will not be recorded. When you are finished recording the macro, select Stop Recording in the Macro menu. Repeat the keystrokes any time by selecting Play Macro. Read more about macros here.

      Load Macro File

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroLoad

        Loads a saved macro file from disk and makes the macro available in the Macro menu. You will see an Open Dialog where you can select the macro file you want to load.

      Play Macro On Select

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroPlayOnSelect

        When this option is checked, the macro you select from the Macro menu will be played once you select it. If the option is not checked, the macro will not be played until you select Play Macro in the Macro menu.

      Save Macro As

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroSaveAs

        Saves the selected macro to a file, using the file name you select in the Save As Dialog.

      Save All Macros As

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroSaveAllAs

        Saves all loaded macros to one single file, using the file name you select in the Save As Dialog.

      Macro Properties

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroProperties

        Changes the properties for the selected macro by displaying the Macro Properties window.

      Remove Macro

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroRemove

        Removes the selected macro from the Macro menu. Note that this command does not remove any macro files from disk.

      Remove All Macros

      Cliptext code: #Menu=MacroRemoveAll

        Removes all loaded macros from the Macro menu. Note that this command does not remove any macro files from disk.

    Tools Menu

    Cliptext code: #Menu=Tools

      Syntax Highlighting

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsSyntax

        Read about syntax highlighting here.

        Refresh

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsSyntaxRefresh

          Updates the syntax highlighting on the visible portion of the current document.

        Refresh All

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsSyntaxRefreshAll

          Updates the syntax highlighting in the entire document, not just the visible portion. This can be useful if the file is relatively small and you don't want Texturizer to frequently update the Syntax Highlighting when you scroll the text. Also, if you want to print documents in full color, you should use this command first to make sure the whole document is colored before printing.

        Remove

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsSyntaxRemove

          Strips the document from any color codes, including Internet links.

        Set Language

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsSyntaxSetLanguage

          Displays a window with the available syntax highlighting languages to allow quick language selections on documents.

        Edit Language

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsSyntaxEditLanguage

          Opens the current STX file in Texturizer so you can edit it. The STX file is the file containing the rules of the color scheme for the current file type. Read more about this here.

        Customize...

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsSyntaxCustomize

      Complete Word

      Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsCompleteWord

        Read about the Complete Word feature here.

        Add Word

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsCompleteWordAddWord

          Presents a dialog that lets you add a word that you type often to a Complete Word list.

        Manage Word Lists

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsCompleteWordManageWordLists

          From this dialog, you can add and remove word lists and specify which file types that should be using them.

        Edit Current Word List

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsCompleteWordEditCurrentWordList

          Opens the cwf file currently used in Texturizer.

        Edit Global Word List

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsCompleteWordEditGlobalWordList

          Opens the Global.cwf file in Texturizer, which contains words available from all file types edited in Texturizer.

        Reload Word Lists

        Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsCompleteWordReloadWordLists

          If you edited Global.cwf or the cwf file for the current file type, use this command to reload the word lists from disk again.

    Check Spelling

    Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsSpellCheck

      Checks the spelling of the active document. This feature uses third party software and requires AutoSpell™ to be installed on your system. Download it at www.spellchecker.com.

    Clipboard Editor

    Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsClipboard

      This feature displays the text content of the Windows Clipboard as a document, allowing you to view and edit the Clipboard using all editing capabilities offered in Texturizer. Even if the Clipboard is changed from another program, the previous Clipboard content will be saved in the Undo/Redo history.

    DOS Command

    Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsDOSCommand

      With this tool, you can execute a DOS command, such as dir and copy, and display and output as a file in Texturizer. Keep in mind that any DOS command you execute in this window will actually be executed on your computer, so be careful what you type! For instance, if you type del *.txt, all text documents will be deleted from the current folder.

    Cliptext Command

    Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsCliptextCommand

      With this tool, you can enter a Cliptext command quickly. It could be anything from inserting plain text into the current document to running a menu command. This can be useful if you're recording a macro.

    Hex Color

    Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsColor

      If you edit a HTML file, you can use this tool to select a color, using a standard color dialog. The color will then be converted to the hexadecimal code automatically.

    HTML/CSS Font

    Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsFont

      If you are editing a HTML file, you can create a <span> tag with CSS by using this feature. Simply select the font name and whether you want to use bold, normal or italic, and press OK. Texturizer will then create the font tag.

    Preview In Browser

    Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsPreview

      Saves a temporary copy of the currently opened HTML file and displays the file in your default browser. This temporary file will be deleted when you close Texturizer, or when you choose to preview another HTML file.

    Options

    Cliptext code: #Menu=ToolsOptions

      Displays the Options window, where you can change all the preferences for Texturizer.

Window Menu

Cliptext code: #Menu=Window

    Next Window

    Cliptext code: #Menu=WindowNext

      Switches to the next document tab in Texturizer.

    Previous Window

    Cliptext code: #Menu=WindowPrevious

      Switches to the previous document tab in Texturizer.

    Last Viewed

    Cliptext code: #Menu=WindowLastViewed

      Switches to the last viewed document tab in Texturizer.

    Close All

    Cliptext code: #Menu=CloseAll

      Closes all opened files. If a file is modified, you will be asked to save that file. This is the same command as the Close All command in the File menu.

    Document List

    Cliptext code: #Menu=WindowDocumentList

      This will display the Document List window, which will display a list of the loaded documents in Texturizer.

Help Menu

Cliptext code: #Menu=Help

    Texturizer User's Guide

    Cliptext code: #Menu=HelpGuide

      Displays this User's Guide using the default web browser.

    Read Me

    Cliptext code: #Menu=HelpReadMe

      Opens the Texturizer.txt file in Texturizer.

    What's New

    Cliptext code: #Menu=HelpWhatsNew

      Opens the History.txt file in Texturizer.

    Ordering Information

    Cliptext code: n/a

      Displays ordering information for Texturizer. This command is only visible if you haven't registered. Please register your copy of Texturizer.

    Order Online

    Cliptext code: n/a

      Displays a window where you can select which license to order. You will be taken to the online ordering page automatically. This command is only visible if you haven't registered. Please register your copy of Texturizer.

    Enter Registration Code

    Cliptext code: n/a

      Use this command when you have ordered Texturizer, to "unlock" your copy of Texturizer.

    Visit Texturizer Online

    Cliptext code: #Menu=HelpOnline

    About

    Cliptext code: #Menu=HelpAbout

      Displays the program version and contact information. Press the Order button on this window to visit the online ordering page, where you will be able to purchase your copy of Texturizer. Press Register to enter your registration information.


Spell Checker

    Texturizer has a built-in support for AutoSpell™, an award winning spell checker for Windows. If you don't have AutoSpell™ installed on your system, you can download it from www.spellchecker.com. You can also download additional dictionaries from there.

    AutoSpell is a registered trademark of CompuBridge, Inc. Used by permission.


Command Line

    Texturizer has a complete command-line support, including wildcards. For instance, you can open all text files in the Windows directory by entering "texturizer c:\windows\*.txt".

    The complete syntax for the command-line is:

    texturizer.exe [/p] [/new] [/tray] [file1] ["file 2"] [...] [: "cliptext data"]

    For file names with spaces, enclose them with quotation marks. However, Texturizer will accept one single file name with spaces that is not enclosed with quotation marks. This is simply for compatibility with incorrect file associations.

    If you want to be able to double click on text files to open them in Texturizer, I recommend you to download the Notepad.exe replacement. Follow the instructions on the website for more information.

    However, if you prefer having Notepad unchanged, you can associate any file type you want with Texturizer anyway. Select Options in the Tools menu of Texturizer, and then click on the Associate tab. However, some programs will still try to launch Notepad anyway. For example, Internet Explorer uses Notepad to display the HTML source.

    As in Notepad, you can use the /P parameter to print a document.

    Example: texturizer /p c:\autoexec.bat

    If you want to open one or more files in a new window when using Tab Mode, you can use the /NEW parameter.

    Example: texturizer /new c:\autoexec.bat

    The /TRAY parameter is used to start Texturizer directly in the systray. This is useful if you have a shortcut to Texturizer in the StartUp folder.

    Example: texturizer /tray

    Finally, you can insert Cliptext from the command-line as well. Use a single colon (:) to separate file names from Cliptext data. Anything after the colon will be treated as Cliptext data. Be sure to enclose the Cliptext string with quotation marks. Otherwise, some characters will not be allowed by the DOS prompt.

    Example 1: texturizer c:\autoexec.bat : "#MacroFile=example.mac|3"

    The example above will first open autoexec.bat, then it will run macro number 3 in the example.mac file.

    Example 2: texturizer : "#menu=toolsclipboard"

    This example will start Texturizer and immediately open the Clipboard Editor.


Frequently Asked Questions

    Q: I installed the latest version of Texturizer, but when starting it, an old version is loaded instead.

    A: You probably replaced Notepad.exe with the old version of Texturizer, and now have two different versions on your computer. You must do the same thing with the new version of Texturizer. A better alternative is to download the small Notepad.exe replacement.

    Q: Why isn't it possible to click on underlined Internet links in Texturizer, just as a normal web browser?

    A: Since Texturizer is a text editor, it's primarily supposed to be able to edit text, including hypertext links. Therefore, in order to activate an underlined link in Texturizer, you must double-click on the link instead of single-clicking on it. Alternatively, you can right-click the link and select Run from the pop-up menu.

    Q: I want to use several fonts in my documents. How do I do this?

    A: You can't. Texturizer is a text editor, which means that it is designed to edit plain text files. For formatted documents, use a word processor instead. However, Texturizer is able to export syntax highlighted files to Rich Text format (*.rtf files).

    Q: If I install AutoSpell for exclusive use with Texturizer, do I have to pay for that program too?

    A: Although I strongly encourage you to support shareware, the authors of AutoSpell have given us the kind permission to use their service for free in Texturizer. Developing software like Texturizer or AutoSpell takes a lot of time and effort, and also costs a lot of money. The development tools alone costs several thousand dollars. By paying for the software you use, you help the developers to improve their software.

    Q: If I register my copy of Texturizer, will I get future version upgrades for free?

    A: Yes. Registration entitles you to use all future shareware versions of Texturizer. This may change in the future (particulary for Texturizer 2.0), but anyone registering Texturizer before that will always be able to upgrade Texturizer.


Contact information

    Support

      Feel free to contact me via e-mail if you have any questions about Texturizer that you can't find the answer to in this User's Guide.

    Bug reporting

      If you discover a bug in Texturizer, first make sure you have the latest version of the program, which can be downloaded from www.texturizer.net. The bug may already have been fixed. If you do have the latest version, you should contact me via e-mail and give me the following information:

      • A detailed description of the bug and, if possible, how to make it occur again.

      • Your operating system (Windows 95, 98, Me, XP, NT 4.0 or 2000) and language.

      • The error code (if any), i.e. "I380".

    The author

      David Tenser

       
        
      ICQ: 8820139


                         
     
     
     
     

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